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Update on arrest and interrogation of student protesters in Tainan, Taiwan

06/05/2009

After the police arrest and interrogation of student protesters, the Tainan police told the press that those people were more likely to be local volunteers for one of the temples than gang members in black shirts  (CJ: how do they know without even questioning them? Or are they all in it together, protecting ‘the Emperor’?). The police also emphasised that they arrested those students with the intention to protect them from those men in black T-shirts (CJ: Really? So in street mugging or pub violence, the police should all arrest the victims for their protection and let the offenders go. We don’t even have to worry about thorough investigations and effective prosecutions anymore).

Both of the temples Ma visited or passed by denied any association with those men in black T-shirt. Given how well trained those men were, some suspect that they might be from the police or national security system and disguise as locals.

The day after the arrest of those students, one of the students wrote on his blog that the police went to where he lived and questioned the receptionist of his building. The police asked personal questions about the student protester and what kind of relationships he had with others in the building. The police officer refused to tell the reception why she was being questioned. The police apparently increased patrol outside of his building and went to talk to the next door neighbour (pro-KMT). The receptionist later found out that the student protested in front of Ma Ying-jeou. The following morning, both the receptionist and the next door neighbour told the student NOT to protest again because there was too much hassle for the neighbours. Frank Hsieh confirmed that he has already asked a human rights lawyer (Kuo?) to help those students. Tainan City Councillor, Chiu Li-li, and DPP Tainan city director, Tsai tung-shi has been a lot of assistance to the students.

Relevant post:

Police arrest and interrogation of non-violent protesters but NOT their violent attackers

6 Comments leave one →
  1. 07/05/2009 07:59

    You may know the phrase, “Nothing to see here.” If the police know the answer, and the answer is “gangsters,” and they’re all hand-in-hand in this, they’re probably not going to tell us.

    But many of us have seen Chang An-le (張安樂, AKA “White Wolf”) saying he sent “a ‘police’ presence” to the November 2008 protests against Chen Yunlin (陳雲林) and that he sent others to protect the “high-class mainlander” Kuo Kuan-ying (郭冠英).

    When the guys in police uniforms ignore thugs in temple uniforms beating up protesters, detain and harass the protesters, then get their neighbors to harass them some more, a conclusion isn’t hard to deduce.

    But when Wang Ding-yu said “黑衣人抓到了六個!” does he mean that they were “apprehended” or just that somebody matched their images up with known police/gangsters/KMT members?

    I guess we have to wait for his follow-up on their identity tomorrow to know for sure. Whatever the answer turns out to be — whether they’re police or cousins of the pope — they’re thugs.

    Tim Maddog

    • Claudia Jean permalink*
      09/05/2009 17:55

      You are right, Tim. they were not ‘apprehended’. They were found and identified. I’ll give the update in another post.

  2. 07/05/2009 08:49

    Wow. Very important follow up post, thanks!

  3. 07/05/2009 12:53

    Thank you for the information. Keep us posted!

  4. Richard permalink
    07/05/2009 15:32

    Why are the Taiwanese gangsters aligning themselves with KMT and China? Growing up in Taiwan, the media has usually portrayed gangsters as “low class” local Taiwanese in a negative stereotype.

    • Claudia Jean permalink*
      09/05/2009 17:59

      That’s the way the KMT government distance themselves from bad deeds. Let’s think about who were asked to assassinate Jiang-nan? Chiang Kai-shek used to have strong associations with crime organisations in Shanghai…

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